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Topic: Paintings by Joseph Farquharson< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 61
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2008,22:54  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Quote (David Yeagley @ Dec. 12, 2008 2:45 pm CT)
Greatest fighters in the world today (ask any British officer), but never of a mind to domineer anyone.


Don't forget the Gurkhas, like the Scots, they've mutinied a couple of times. Funny, they've no mind for domineering either.  

Quote (David Yeagley @ Dec. 12, 2008 2:45 pm CT)
Deep and delicate folk.


Maybe deep, but no so delicate. In fact it's probably safe to say the complete opposite.

 Post Number: 62
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2008,22:59 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Quote (nettles @ Dec. 12, 2008 3:38 pm CT)
I'm lost here. Early in the thread Mac talks about, pictures, paintings. So i assumed this riddle was about all the paintings at the site, but now it just seems to be about one painting. So which is it?

Sorry Nettles, it was never meant to be a riddle. It's such an easy question that I never dreamt that there'd be a problem with it. It only became a riddle when people needed clues.

It's about all the pictures, each of them has exactly the same quality about them. And, each of them, has exactly the same missing thing.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2008,00:27 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Spring, summer and fall are missing.   No leaves to be seen, of any colour.   The last of the seasons of life.   Winters.  

We just had a blast come in tonight.   North wind and blowing snow.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2008,09:33 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mark, this post started by Nettles is becoming an bit of an attention-getter, don't you think?

"I have the secret information, and I will tell you only when I feel like it."

Well, it's a bit long, I would say. A week after he decided to enter the fray of "art critique". Another classic irritating Mac Coinneach strategy. He's gone beyond a good sport, as usual. I won't be clickety clicking here any more.

Personally, there are too many other interesting paintings to look and wonder at.

In my experienced view, this is a second-rate painter. The problem is the colors are too gaudy. It is charming in its own way, though. The paintings remind me of the "Painter of Light" Thomas Kinkade, another "popular" painter - nothing wrong with that, mind you.

It will appeal to specific people, who recognize the place and the imagery ("what's there and what isn't" wink, wink). That is the charm of many paintings, and they are important in that regard.

Mac Coinneach as usual has deflated the charm of something that could have stayed that way.

This could have been a fun exercise and cultural exchange.


------------------------------------
From the biographical text on the online tate gallery.

See? Easy.

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The sheep, however, were false, fabricated in plaster by a local sculptor.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2008,11:30 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Quote (SheDesigns @ Dec. 13, 2008 9:33 am CT)
Mark, this post started by Nettles is becoming an bit of an attention-getter, don't you think?

"I have the secret information, and I will tell you only when I feel like it."


Ah, there now, there we have it. You see Kidist, you and the good doctor like to opine on this mythical white race of yours, but when it really comes down to it, you know absolutely nothing about "whiteness". The bottom line is, how could either of you?

And the thing of it is, I hail from one of the white races, and I'm a pure-blood too. So, unfortunately for the sake of your arguments, I'm able to speak to them as someone that actually knows what they're talking about. I know full-well that the white races are completely different from each other, it was part of my childhood indoctrination into the "brotherhood of whiteness". Too bad neither of you could have shared that experience with me, because neither of you would be telling me what a unified group whites are. Fiddlesticks, what a foolish idea.

There's no secret to what's missing from the paintings, any Scot would ken the answer to the question in an instant, even those of a rather British mindset. But you, who would dare tell a Scotsman how he should feel about something, are at a loss to even form an opinion. And, when it comes down to it, how could you?

It'd be like me "knowing" how an Indian should react to something, or for that matter, what an Ethiopian thinks about things. I wouldn't dare to comment on either topic.

But, you and the Doc presume to know things that are simply beyond your ken.

And that's spoken by a real Scot, and one-time holder of a British passport, and genuine full-blooded "white" person.

Quote (SheDesigns @ Dec. 13, 2008 9:33 am CT)
Well, it's a bit long, I would say. A week after he decided to enter the fray of "art critique". Another classic irritating Mac Coinneach strategy. He's gone beyond a good sport, as usual. I won't be clickety clicking here any more.


It's not about the art. I'm no art critic.

By the way Kidist, the reason I "irritate" you is because I know you don't have a clue about whiteness, and you don't like being reminded of it. And probably an even worse sin on my part is that I can't be bothered with the wonder of the colour of my skin. My race is what's important to me, I couldn't be arsed about being "white". Whiteness is for white people that have lost grip on their own culture, it's all they have to fall back on.

Quote (SheDesigns @ Dec. 13, 2008 9:33 am CT)
Personally, there are too many other interesting paintings to look and wonder at.

In my experienced view, this is a second-rate painter. The problem is the colors are too gaudy. It is charming in its own way, though. The paintings remind me of the "Painter of Light" Thomas Kinkade, another "popular" painter - nothing wrong with that, mind you.


Yes indeed, let's say the paintings are gaudy now. Let's attack the question rather than your inability to answer it.

Common strategy around here, if I'm not mistaken.

Quote (SheDesigns @ Dec. 13, 2008 9:33 am CT)
Mac Coinneach as usual has deflated the charm of something that could have stayed that way.


Wrong again. There's nothing charming at all in those pictures. Just cold, empty tragedy.

Quote (SheDesigns @ Dec. 13, 2008 9:33 am CT)
This could have been a fun exercise and cultural exchange.


Indeed it could have been, were there not people like yourself who would presume to tell someone of a different culture/race/colour to their own, what proper opinion that person should have on a topic you know nothing about.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2008,12:42 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

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Wrong again. There's nothing charming at all in those pictures. Just cold, empty tragedy



Perhaps. Fascinating point really.

I like the paintings because of the beauty of nature. But without a man in them working so hard to live they would be meaningless to me.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2008,14:07 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Quote (nettles @ Dec. 14, 2008 12:42 pm CT)
Perhaps. Fascinating point really.


The Burns' poem they used for the pictures was a good choice, it's a dirge.

Quote (nettles @ Dec. 14, 2008 12:42 pm CT)
I like the paintings because of the beauty of nature. But without a man in them working so hard to live they would be meaningless to me.


As an aside, I see the pictures differently than most for two reasons. First, because of my racial background and second, because I was born with deuteranopia.

This picture Dr. Yeagley posted:



Looks something like this to me:



To me, those two pictures look the same, except the bottom one may be a bit lighter.

Amusing eh, here's me, the colour-blind guy, posting on a forum where colour is so important. Racially speaking, of course.

The guid Lord does like His wee jokes.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2008,18:58 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, no matter in the coloring.  (I can't help it because technology cant reproduce accurately.)

So, Mac, you've never once responded to any of my suggested interpretations about the painting.  I'm not trying to tell anyone how to feel or interpret.  You posed the questions to us.  I simply responded.  

I put the painting up, because Nettles put up the whole site on a link, and because I think they are rather fantastic paintings!  

Good grief, man.  No one is trying to get Scottish on you.   :D    Just artistic interpretations.  Attempt to interpret what the painter has expressed.  You posed a riddle of some kind, and the rest of us, Italian, Ethiopian, Indian, and the like, were just trying to figure it out.  You invited us, seems to me.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 15 2008,07:43 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mac,
           I like the painting in either coloration. How I would love to have one hanging in my house!

           I must show my two color blind sons your comments. While that disability did not hit me it was in my father. I can remember being a child and playing with a book he had with those examples in them.
           The question hit me for the first time, is color blindness more prevalent in any race or nationality?  Could find no stats at all. But this comment kept being repeated .................."Color blindness affects a significant number of people, although exact proportions vary among groups. In Australia, for example, it occurs in about 8 percent of males and only about 0.4 percent of females.[18] Isolated communities with a restricted gene pool sometimes produce high proportions of color blindness, including the less usual types. Examples include rural Finland, Hungary, and some of the Scottish islands." Ah well, for what it's worth.
           
               Now about the tragedy. As an American I always look at farm scenes as the cup half full rather than empty. A man with a herd of animals looks like an independent soul with real skills for living to me. A happy life away from big bosses and big cities. Even if it is a hard life.   Of coarse that's not what country living was for everyone. I just prefer to think of the ideal.
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